colbert calls out our hypocrisy

saw this on mike king‘s blog, and clicked over to watch it on colbert nation. so good! sure, it’s funny and all; but truth of it is inescapable.

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9 thoughts on “colbert calls out our hypocrisy”

  1. He called us out on our hypocrisy? Really? I didn’t get that. It sounded more like the bitter, sarcastic ravings of a man who hates it when people are allowed (encouraged) to become totally dependent on the government or some other organization to take care of them. Our church is heavily involved with helping the REAL poor. Our primary goal for 2011 is to double our efforts in this area. If you read the WHOLE Bible, I think you will discover that taking personal responsibility and recognizing laziness is mentioned quite often as well. To achieve accuracy when interpreting the scriptures, we are to compare the bible to the bible. We are not to just go in and find a verse here and there that fits our “liberal-because-it’s-cool” agenda (as Colbert does in this clip). The church does the chronically ABLE-BODIED dependent no favor by feeding their addiction to dependency on government, para-church organizations, community outreach programs, churches, etc. We treat them as He would has us to when we first show His love by meeting their physical needs, but then leading them to a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Once they experience a genuine conversion, as a “new creation” they – as a new member of the body of Christ – will now desire to bless others as they have been blessed by Christ’s body. They can’t bless others until the church disciples them to get off their “someone-else-should-take-care-of-me” addiction. So it’s crystal clear to me that all Colbert is doing here is regurgitating the same garbage being spewed out by his cronies at MSNBC, mediamatters.org, The Huffington Post, and on and on and on and on.

    I understand that it is construed as open-minded and cool for evangelical Christians to listen to and learn from people like Colbert. I have read the books about the way unbelievers view the church as a bunch of mean, bitter, uncaring hypocrites. I get that and I agree that we (the church) need to change our approach so we more accurately reflect the loving heart of Christ to the unchurched/unsaved. I grew up in church all my life. My dad was a pastor. I know what a mean uncaring “Christian” is. I get it that church/religious people killed Jesus, but it is very difficult for me to listen to and learn from those who sarcastically “call out my hypocrisy” about the way I treat the poor, when they not only believe it’s fine to kill an unborn baby, but seem to delight in it. Dr. Vance Havner warned us that open-mindedness is fine, let’s just make sure we’re not so open-minded our brain falls out.

  2. Ferrell, in your final point, you make some large assumptions, namely that if you agree with what was said by Colbert, or are a liberal leaning Christian, you are pro-choice.

    I vote democrat based on their social platform, because the church is doing a terrible job in general of taking care of “the least of these”. I vote for heath care for little kids, I vote for education and I vote for welfare.

    I am pro-life in every sense of the word, not just the unborn sense. I am pro-life when it comes to capital punnisment, foreign policy and war, and gun control.

    I think the point that you’re missing, the point that the church in general is missing is that grace is not earned, and we are not the ones who decide who is worthy of it. God gives his grace freely to all, we should pass it on, regardless of the response.

    Christ calls the purest religion to take care of widows and orphans, who were people with no power, no way to make it in that culture. We should be looking out for the powerless in our culture. Does our system need reform? yes, of course, but it’s doing a better job than the church is in most cases, and that is a sad, sad state of affairs.

  3. Ferrell, in your final point, you make some large assumptions, namely that if you agree with what was said by Colbert, or are a liberal leaning Christian, you are pro-choice. I vote democrat based on their social platform, because the church is doing a terrible job in general of taking care of “the least of these”. I vote for heath care for little kids, I vote for education and I vote for welfare. I am pro-life in every sense of the word, not just the unborn sense. I am pro-life when it comes to capital punnisment, foreign policy and war, and gun control. I think the point that you’re missing, the point that the church in general is missing is that grace is not earned, and we are not the ones who decide who is worthy of it. God gives his grace freely to all, we should pass it on, regardless of the response. Christ calls the purest religion to take care of widows and orphans, who were people with no power, no way to make it in that culture. We should be looking out for the powerless in our culture. Does our system need reform? yes, of course, but it’s doing a better job than the church is in most cases, and that is a sad, sad state of affairs.

  4. I think this is one of Colbert’s best! Loved the satire! But I should admit that I enjoy a lot of Colbert’s material…

    On a personal note, I’m now a pastor of two very small churches in the middle of nowhere in Colorado. I still feel an affinity/gravity toward youth ministry, and I plan to keep it that way (which is why I’m still around here). It recently came to my attention that a family in one of our small towns was in need, and they asked our church for help. We have very limited resources–I’m the only paid staff, and between both churches, I’m still bi-vocational. I wanted to make sure that this family really warranted help, so before helping them, I went to our local police station to find out whether this family regularly got in trouble with the law (dealing drugs, etc.). Since we don’t have money lying around, I wanted to be able to tell the congregations that I felt this was a legitimate need, before sacrificing what little we have to pay their rent, etc. The family seemed to check out, so we are helping them out. I am wondering if you think I was wrong for doing this–should we have just given our money freely to them regardless? I admit that would have been hard for me to do, partly because it’s not my money–it’s other people’s money who often have sacrificed to give it to these churches. But I have similar feelings toward money I give myself. I’m curious what people think about this. I can see both sides, but I lean toward putting money into people/organizations that I feel warrant it more than others.

    Thanks!

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