Tag Archives: jesus creed

scot mcknight on ym3.0, part 3

i’m so stoked that uber-blogger and brilliant theological mind, scot mcknight, has chosen to post a three-part review/discussion of youth ministry 3.0. what a huge honor. i’ve been deeply impacted by scot’s books, his blog (jesus creed), his talks, and his friendship.

here’s part 3 of his three-parter. there’s great discussion on his blog, by a wider slice of church leadership types that i tend to have here on ysmarko (so it’s really worth clicking over and reading the comments). you can see my response to his blog question there also.

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So, what can we do? Marko, in his new book, Youth Ministry 3.0: A Manifesto of Where We’ve Been, Where We Are & Where We Need to Go , has a bundle of suggestions and I want to discuss a few of them today.

What do you think? Are any of you in YM 3.0? What are you seeing? What are your suggestions?

If the focus is affinity and we need to move more into communion and mission, what will 3.0 youth ministries look like?

We may need to develop multiple youth ministries within the same church to speak into multiple youth cultures.

We may need one youth ministry with a dream of supra-culture, kingdom of God culture.

Or a hybrid of the two. He makes several proposals, like one group for some stuff and smaller groups for other things.

We may need to cut programs; we may need to get small; provide opportunities for youth to experience God. We need to be “communional.” It is small, slow, simple, fluid, present, and Jesus-y.

We need to focus on integrating teenagers with the church. And we need to be more missional.

scot mcknight on ym3.0, part 2

i’m so stoked that uber-blogger and brilliant theological mind, scot mcknight, has chosen to post a three-part review/discussion of youth ministry 3.0. what a huge honor. i’ve been deeply impacted by scot’s books, his blog (jesus creed), his talks, and his friendship.

here’s part 2 of his three-parter. there’s great discussion on his blog, by a wider slice of church leadership types that i tend to have here on ysmarko (so it’s really worth clicking over and reading the comments). you can see my response to his blog question there also.

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We need to develop an ongoing conversation about youth ministry. Marko’s book provides for us a virtual history of youth ministry in the last 50+ years and does so clearly and simply. We need this book. (By the way, “Marko” on the cover is a mock cover I found online.)

As you read this post, think about whether or not you agree with his 3-fold scheme. Maybe you don’t agree with it all, but in general. What do you think of his 3.0 proposals?

Here are the characteristics of Youth Ministry 1.0 according to Marko’s new book, Youth Ministry 3.0: A Manifesto of Where We’ve Been, Where We Are & Where We Need to Go :

The 50s gave rise to a youth culture and this led to ministries like Youth for Christ and Young Life. The major emphases were on two things:

Evangelism

Correction

Youth ministry 1.0 was proclamation-driven. It was fixated on identity formation and a theme verse would have been Matthew 7:13-14: “Enter through the narrow gate …”.

Youth Ministry 2.0 focused on autonomy (youth culture had confidence now) and discipleship programs and creating a positive peer group. 2.0 was not so much proclamation as program-driven. A theme verse was Matthew 28:19-20a: make disciples and teach them.

Youth Ministry 3.0, call it a “third way,” realizes it cannot meet this generation’s needs with a 2.0 set of assumptions and methods. Youth culture has become the dominant culture in our world. And it is powerfully fragmented. It gives rise to the need for affinity groups. He says we need cultural anthropologists with relational passion. The themes are

Communion

Mission

Big idea for Marko: if 1.0 was proclamation-driven and 2.0 was program-driven, 3.0 needs to be not-driven. It wants to be Present. Marko thinks some prototypical Bible verses will be Acts 2:42-46.

scot mcknight on ym3.0, part 1

i’m so stoked that uber-blogger and brilliant theological mind, scot mcknight, has chosen to post a three-part review/discussion of youth ministry 3.0. what a huge honor. i’ve been deeply impacted by scot’s books, his blog (jesus creed), his talks, and his friendship.

here’s part 1 of his three-parter. there’s great discussion on his blog, by a wider slice of church leadership types that i tend to have here on ysmarko (so it’s really worth clicking over and reading the comments). you can see my response to his blog question there also.

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I sat down the other day with a youth pastor and asked a direct question that I’ve asked a number of youth leaders: “What percentage of your youth become adult, mature Christians?”

His response: “You want the truth?”

I said, “Of course.”

His answer: “About 25%.”

We both sat there, fumbling our coffee cups, looking at one another, nothing said and nothing to be said. In grief and wonder we searched for what we might do together to change the course of the church. His numbers are about average for evangelical churches. I wonder if some youth pastors would sit down, think for 15 minutes or so over the last few years and what has become of their youth. What “worked” and what “didn’t work”? Listen to these ruggedly honest words from Mark Oestreicher:

“The way we’re doing things is already not working. We’re failing at our calling. And deep down, most of us know it. This is why we need an epochal shift in our assumptions, approaches, models, and methods.” This is from Marko’s new book: Youth Ministry 3.0: A Manifesto of Where We’ve Been, Where We Are & Where We Need to Go . We want this blog to participate in that “epochal shift” and so we need to take a good hard look at this book.

Marko’s second chp sets up some important terms, and they overlap with our series on iGens. Three features of youth happen during adolescence:

1. Identity (formation): Who am I?
2. Autonomy: How am I unique and different?
3. Affinity: Where do I belong and to whom?

Marko’s proposal: the priorities of these three have shifted. From WW2 through the 60s, the focus was on identity. From the 70s through the 90s, the focus was on autonomy. The newest generation, however, is not as much about identity and autonomy as about affinity.

Youth ministry, Marko contends, has failed to adjust to the shift of emphasis on affinity.

Marko (and others), here’s a question for you: Would you say that I, as a professor, would have felt 30 years ago that my students were not yet adults but today I might sense that I’m not in their world? Has there been a shift from youth growing into the adult world to a culture much more shaped by their culture?

scot mcknight’s blog gives a weekly focus to youth ministry

uber-blogger scot mcknight (also a brilliant author, theologian and friend) has been friendly to youth workers for a while. i think the fact that he teaches undergrads (and chose to, after years at the seminary level) makes him a bit of a youth worker himself. scot joined our ‘junior high pastors summit’ a few years back as our special guest, and we youth workers found a deep connection with him. he’s also presented well-received seminars at the nywc (and is going to be at a couple of them this fall also).

but i was especially pleased when scot emailed to say that he’d like to make his blog — jesus creed — more intentional about addressing youth ministry. and, to that end, scot (and his lovely wife, kris) plan on hosting a weekly post about youth ministry, on thursday mornings. for now, this weekly post will be written by our friend, chris folmsbee.

here’s what scot writes about it:
Through a variety of influences I have renewed my own commitment to the utter significance of youth ministry today — and I mean by that from junior high until adulthood (and that might mean 12 to 30!). Our future churches are rooted in what happens in the next decade with this age group. I have asked a dynamic young youth minister, Chris Folmsbee, to guide us in some conversations about youth ministry. And I’m urging you to join us in this conversation. Today Chris helps us think about “mission” — and he’s got a thoroughly up-to-date approach to mission.
the first of these weekly posts went up yesterday.

one of the best things about scot’s blog is that, due to his huge readership, there is often robust and thoughtful dialogue in the comments. i hope this continues on these youth ministry posts!

check scot’s blog on thursday mornings (and the rest of the days of the week also, for that matter).