Tag Archives: junior high ministry

12 things i love about middle school ministry

a number of years ago i wrote a post listing reasons why i love middle school ministry. and recently, i re-wrote that post as a column for youthwork magazine (in the UK). here’s my list (realize that “middle school ministry” doesn’t mean anything in the UK, so i use their term “11 – 14s” or young teens instead):

IMG_386712 Things to Love About Young Teen Ministry

  1. Young teen ministry is about shaping. What an opportunity! Everything I learn about young teens continues to affirm and re-affirm that this is not merely a holding period until the good stuff of older teen work.
  2. 11 – 14s are easy to connect with. Years ago, a youth ministry mentor shared this simple observation: 11 – 14s, in their decision as to whether they’ll allow you into their lives, are only asking the question, “Do you like me?” Older teens complicate it more by adding, “Do I like you?” And university students ramp up the complexity by layering on the additional question, “Do I like what you stand for?”
  3. They’re willing to try anything. The young teen years (in a post-puberty parallel to the first few years of life) are all about discovery, or sampling. Young teens, in the earliest stages of self-conscious identity formation, want to try everything. They don’t start testing conclusions until the middle teen years. This is a wild ride of unpredictability, of course, and can feel very scattered and capricious. But there’s willingness—even desire—to try things that makes young teens prime for creative and participatory youth work.
  4. The wonder of abstract thinking. 11 – 14s are far from experienced with abstract thought. But the capacity is there (I like to think of it as God’s puberty gift). And they’re dipping their toes in the water, checking it out.
  5. The process of doubts and faith development. Tied to the development of abstract thinking, young teens are on the leading edge of stumbling onto doubts about their faith. This is a critical aspect of faith development, and should never be shamed or shut down. Wrestling with complexities is the necessary detour from childlike, inherited faith to a more robust, owned faith.
  6. They’re unpredictable. Maybe you find this frustrating, but I love it. Young teens regularly and consistently surprise me. They surprise me with their random questions. They surprise me with their hidden talents. They surprise me with their insight. They surprise me with their interpretations (often different than I expect). The unpredictability of 11 – 14s keeps young teen ministry fresh and untamed.
  7. Parents are still involved. Sure, there are plenty of older teens with involved parents. But there’s a drop-off in parent involvement throughout the teen years, as many parents retreat out of fear, exasperation, or a misguided understanding of what it means to give their teenagers independence. We know that parents have a significantly larger shaping role in the lives and faith of their teenagers than we do; so this higher level of parent involvement creates an easier path to coming alongside parents, partnering for greater impact.
  8. They have more time than older teenagers. Yes, young teens are busier than ever; but they still have more time and availability than their older peers. Mix this in with their #3 above (their willingness to try anything), and you’ve got a potent pot of “let’s do stuff!”
  9. Most are not yet jaded. 14 year-olds can start to get a little jaded (some of ‘em). Older teenagers—holy cow—can wear cynicism and “been there, done that” as comfortably as Lady Gaga wears a meat suit. But most young teens possess wonderfully low levels of cynicism, and a naiveté that looks a lot like hope.
  10. They’re passionate. I love the “all in” attitude of most 11 – 14s. It’s not only their willingness to try things (mentioned in #3 above); they’re also passionate about the things they try, the opinions they voice, the beliefs they hold. The funny thing is: they’re passionate about things that, often, they won’t be passionate about in two months or two years.
  11. They’re forgiving. When you mess up, or have an off night in your teaching, or plan a lame event, or say something dumb, young teens are quick to forgive (particularly if you ask for it). The travel time back to normal (whatever that is!) is extremely short.
  12. They’re fun! Young teens keep me feeling young (not so easy at 50 years-old). They’re playful and hilarious, goofy and unselfconscious. Young teens remind me, regularly, of what a joy-filled life should look like.

if you agree with me on at least most of these, then you need to join us at the third annual Middle School Ministry Campference. the earlybird registration price (and $50 bonus back of free stuff and campference munchies) runs out in two weeks, on june 30!

my-tribe-square

golf club

being a middle school guys small group leader is like being a mediocre golfer

last night, all the small group leaders from my church’s youth ministry had an end-of-the-school-year thank you dinner and wrap up. the high school and middle school leaders ate together; but then we slit off into separate ministry groupings to debrief the year a bit. here’s a little pano of our middle school small group leaders, minus about 5 or so who couldn’t be there last night (you can click on it to see it bigger, if you’re so inclined):

IMG_4421

the main thing we did was share stories (i’m a BIG fan of this, btw, as stories communicate all sorts of embodied truth). once the ball got rolling, everyone had something to share, and there was a beautiful sense of “i am not alone.”

i was, by far, the oldest one there (there are a couple other leaders my age, but they weren’t at the meeting). and i was also one of the only leaders there with more than a few years of experience. but, honestly, this was one of the hardest years of middle school ministry for me in a long time. i shared with our team that i really struggled, second guessed myself, and wondered what was going wrong. i vacillated between being completely stoked about my guys and being completely annoyed by them. my group was too big, and too impossible to focus, and too easily distracted (yes, more than normal for middle school guys!), and too quick to speak on top of each other (almost constantly).

as i was about to share with the other leaders last night, a metaphor for my experience of being a middle school ministry volunteer this year jumped into my mind:

i used to be a golfer. like, i used to golf about 2 or 3 times a month. i read articles about golfing. i bought golf clubs. i tried out new courses. and, yes, i even watched golf on TV (and played a lot of tiger woods golf on my xbox).

but i was never a good golfer. at my best, i was a mediocre golfer. i probably would have had to triple-down on the number of times i played in order to see a difference in my game, and i wasn’t willing (or able) to do that. so, consistently, my golf games looked like this:

approximately 10 – 20 shots in a row would totally suck. i hit the ball too short. i shanked it. i putted past the hole and right off the green. i lost it in the woods or the lake. i topped it, hard, and the ball dribbled forward about 10 feet. occasionally i even completely whiffed–swinging my club with focus, intention and expectation, but not actually connecting with the ball. somewhere between the 7th and 12th bad shot in a row, i fairly consistently had the same sorts of thoughts enter my head or exit my mouth:

this game sucks.

why would anyone subject themselves to this? and i’m paying for this! what is wrong with me?

this game is impossible. or at least, this game is impossible for me.

there is absolutely no enjoyment in golf beyond the cigar in my mouth and the beer waiting for me in the clubhouse.

but, then: deep into my discouragement and disillusionment and fatalism and plans to quit, i’d hit a chip shot onto the green and it would drop in the hole. or i’d somehow hit a fairway wood just right, and by some miracle, it would perfectly curve around that tree in the middle of the fairway and catch the leading edge of a downward slope, adding 50 feet to my shot.

and when i hit one of those shots, well, i couldn’t stop then! i either had to take another shot to see if i might be on some sort of streak of brilliance (or i’d suddenly become a fantastic golfer, somehow), or i took another shot because i just didn’t care, since i was basking in the joy of what had just occurred.

THAT, my middle school ministry friends, is what this past year of leading an 8th grade guys small group felt like for me, a 33 year veteran of middle school ministry. there were absolutely stunning moments of beauty. flashes of insight. spaces of deep honesty and vulnerability. DMZs of listening to each other. absolute god moments.

there were less moments of awesomeness than there were moments of annoyance; but there were just enough to keep me from quitting.

and here’s the litmus test for me: i stop and think of each guy’s face, picturing him in my mind’s eye. and i pay attention to what i’m feeling. and i can honestly say that for each one of them, my internal response is “oh, man, i love that kid! he is so awesome. i have so much HOPE for his future.”

so, yeah, i’ll take another small group next fall.

my-tribe-square

Join us at the 2014 Middle School Ministry Campference!

my-tribe-square- Customized learning about Middle School Ministry.
- Conversations with people who understand you.
- Rubbing shoulders with JH Ministry vets and experts.
- Worship.
- Laughter.
- Dialogue.
- Ziplines and skeet shooting and nature and camp food and silliness and lip syncing and late night secret sharing and rest.

What’s the only place you can experience every single one of those in one weekend? The Middle School Ministry Campference, of course. Come join with your tribe.

Here’s what a few of last year’s attendees had to say:

The MSMC is like getting one-on-one training focused on Middle School Ministry all day long. From the speakers on stage to the person sitting next to you, every person brings it at the MSMC. Every time you start a conversation you know it could be the best one of the weekend.

It’s unlike any other youth ministry conference. Not only do you get great content, but the laid back camp atmosphere creates a great environment for building relationships with other middle school youth workers.

Middle School Ministry Campference isn’t about all the hype and pizzazz of other conferences. It’s about being together with the strange creatures that Middle School Pastors are. It’s not about showing you creative things; it’s about inspiring creativity in all of us. The connections that you make here are 1000x better and more useful than the handful of notes you’ll take anywhere else and never look at again. If I had the choice between Campference and any other conference, I’d choose this every time.

The Campference site is now live, and registration is open! We work hard to keep our all-inclusive rates crazy-low. And thanks to our partners, we’re able to offer Early Bird registration, including LODGING AND ALL MEALS at these great rates:

  • $320 – Early Bird Single Registration (register by June 30, 2014)
  • $295 – Early Bird Group Rate, per person (groups of 3 or more, register by June 30, 2014)

As added Early Bird perks, we’re throwing in more than $50 of extra goodies, FREE:

web-header

my brand new book: 99 THOUGHTS FOR JUNIOR HIGHERS

99-thoughts-for-junior-highersi wrote a thing.

actually, i co-wrote it. with my good friend brooklyn lindsey.

it’s called 99 Thoughts for Junior Highers: Biblical Truth in Bite-Sized Pieces

we both completely dig junior highers/middle schoolers/young teens. really: i’ve been working with them for 33 years, brooklyn for lots of years also (she’s clearly not as old as me). i wrote another one of these a year ago with my own two niños (99 Thoughts on Raising Your Parents), and thought it was a blast to write. so we were pretty pumped when Simply Youth Ministry said yes to our idea of adding this book to their 99 Thoughts line.

if you’re familiar with the 99 Thoughts line, you might be surprised by this: even though we wrote for young teens, the “thoughts” are longer than most of the books in this series (in fact, we turned in a manuscript that was almost exactly twice as long as requested!). there’s depth to this book, even though it cover a LOT of ground in a limited amount of space.

we broke the 99 Thoughts into 11 “chapters” (really, subject groupings):

  • Who Am I? – Understanding Yourself
  • What’s Happening to Me? – Everything About You Is Changing
  • You and God
  • The Low-Down on Church
  • How Do I Figure Out What I Believe?
  • Friends
  • Family
  • Future Matters
  • What’s Most Important? – Figuring Out Priorities
  • Your Crazy Life
  • Girls and Guys

each chapter also has a “Story from Junior High Marko” or “Junior High Brooklyn.” they’re true stories from our own young teen years, thematically connected to the chapter, and told from our perspective as if we were junior highers. a little weird, but fun.

here’s the back cover copy:

Life for a typical junior higher is awesome. And hard. And fun. And exciting. And boring. And crazy, right? Basically, it’s a blur of all those things—and more!

Junior high truly is a season of ups and downs, of possibilities and confusion, of amazing memories and embarrassing moments. To survive it all, you sometimes just need a little help—or 99 bite-sized bits of help!

Mark Oestreicher and Brooklyn Lindsey—youth pastors who’ve worked with people your age for a long, long time—have teamed up to create this insider’s guide for this wild ride.

They’ll help as you examine the changes in your life, figure out what you believe, see where God and church fit into the picture, choose how to interact with family and friends, and decide what matters most in life. And you’ll read some true stories about the authors’ own junior high years!

99 Thoughts for Junior Highers will entertain, engage, and encourage you during this crazy season of life!

we really hope that youth workers and parents will get it for their 11 – 14 year-olds. it’s a great stocking stuffer, mom & dad. it’s a fun small group christmas gift (which you could totally use in small groups come january). check it out or buy it here!

and, for a bit of oddity, here’s a li’l promo video i shot in my hotel room at o’hare airport last night when i got stuck there on my way home…

overheard at my 8th grade guys small group

IMG_3867just a short collection of awesome and/or awkward quotes from my 8th grade guys small group this past week:

8th grade guy: For Halloween, I decided to wear the best costume of all time.
(btw, i don’t even remember what the costume was — it didn’t strike me as all that awesome.)

8th grade guy: In basketball the other day, I swear I was Mickey Mantle.
another 8th grade guy: wait, wasn’t Mickey Mantle baseball?
first 8th grade guy: (look of confusion)

(during one guy’s sharing of highs and lows–or “happy/crappy,” as we’ve come to call it–he interrupted himself, then forgot what he’d been saying…)
another 8th grade guy: I’ve never seen somebody distract himself before.

8th grade guy: That would take SO much self control, which I have none of.
(i don’t remember what this comment was related to, but it cracked me up. and props for self-awareness!)

(we were talking about a commitment to ‘confidentiality’ as an important part of our group…)
8th grade guy: yeah, like, it’s bad to gypsy.
me: gypsy?
8th grade guy: i said ‘gossip.’
three 8th grade guys in unison: you said gypsy!

8th grade guy: Pinterest is tumblr for moms

(i was attempting to unpack the idea of confidentiality. we’d talked about not gossipping. and we’d defined confidentiality and why it’s important. then this happened.)
me: it’s sort of like, this room needs to be Vegas.
8th grade guy: does that mean we’re going to come home from small group with herpes?

the Campference after-buzz (with photos!)

our third annual Middle School Ministry Campference was this past weekend. and it just doesn’t do it justice to say that it was a blast. there’s something so completely unique about this event and the vibe we share that makes it very, very different than other youth ministry events (even the good ones!).

as i told the group in my “camp rules” during the first session, those who have been before know that the really great breakouts and seminars and main sessions aren’t the best thing about the event. even though they’re really great, lots of youth ministry events have great breakouts and seminars and main sessions. the best part of campference is doing life together with 100+ people who love middle schoolers. it’s the long conversations around meals. it’s the laughter during breaks. it’s the 30 people running into buffalo wild wings. it’s the group of people making s’mores around the fire pit while another group are screaming their heads off on nighttime zipline runs. it’s speakers who are player/coaches, present the entire weekend and more accessible than anywhere else. it’s the slight irreverence. it’s the lack of a “plane” between “the stage” and “the audience.” it’s praying for one another.

here’s a little sampling of photos from my iphone (adam will have much more lovely photos from his good camera):

springhill camp in seymour is a very different setting for a youth ministry event, for starters. and this sort of view sure doesn’t hurt set the tone.
IMG_3082.lo

kurt johnston and katie edwards were our main session emcees for the 2nd year in a row, and are just such a blast.
IMG_3086

a week out, we scrambled to organize a lip-sync competition. and it was a total win. 10 competitors gave us loads of laughs.
IMG_3110

this moment, saturday night during free time (really, the whole event is free time!) captured some of the essence of this event for me. at one table, kenny & elle campbell were leading a discussion about marriage & ministry; and at the next table, there was a texas hold ‘em game getting going.
IMG_3115

each year we invite two keynote speakers who are a little outside the middle school ministry tribe. this year those were dave rahn and amanda drury. both were uh-maze-ing, not just in their main session talks, but in the way they were present to people all weekend long. mandy talked about the role of doubt in her main session talk, and this moment was brilliant. she used the balloons to represent doubts, and the bowling ball to represent faith. she summarized with “one grain of faith is more powerful than all the doubts in the world.”
IMG_3112

the campference is also about relationships and friendships, new and old. this is me with tim mauriello. tim is a 40-something middle school pastor in indiana. AND, he was a junior higher in my first church!
IMG_3097

a peek into Kurt Johnston’s morning devotions

love this little video of kurt talking about this crazy little event called the Middle School Ministry Campference. kurt helped me dream it up, and was my original sounding board when my dream of the event was just a scattered mess of vision and impulse.

and, in this video, you will catch a glimpse of the quality biblical materials kurt uses for his own devotional life.

the Campference start FIVE WEEKS FROM TODAY! this year we’re adding some awesome new speakers, and some sweet new conversation options, and a bunch of other goodies. (oh, and this week the camp approved our crazy idea of a combo zipline and paintball game during free time. they didn’t go for the combo zipline and skeet shooting, though.) but the best thing about the Campference remains the same — hanging with the middle school ministry tribe.

holy cow. it’s gonna be a blast.

HOW TO SAVE $30

message-from-lenny

Hi. I’m Lenny, Marko & Adam’s summer intern. I figured I’d be making coffee and copies, turns out I have to wear this stupid dinosaur costume to work every day.

But it’ll be worth it, I’m sure.

Anyway, Marko and Adam wanted me to tell you that this Sunday is the early bird deadline for the Middle School Ministry Campference. Apparently, doing that will save you $30 per person. And that’s a lot of money in my world considering I’m living in a tent in Adam’s backyard and Marko is only paying me $50 for the whole summer.

It’ll be worth it, I’m sure.

Sincerely,

Lenny the intern

an awesome new middle school bible (and a screamin’ deal on pre-orders)

HEY, EVERYONE WHO WORKS WITH MIDDLE SCHOOLERS (or junior highers, or whatever you call young teens in your context)!

get ready for…

Ignite - The Bible for TeensNKJV Ignite Bible for Teens

i was pretty stoked last year when i got contacted about a new bible being created by thomas nelson publishers for young teens. at first, i was just giving opinions (which i’m rarely short of). but eventually, my role grew to that of general editor on this awesome bible. our hope with this bible was to create a bible that would help young teens with a few bible-related issues:

  1. we wanted a bible they would be pumped about, one that connected with them in content and design, one they would be excited about carrying around and opening up.
  2. we wanted a bible that would help them find what the bible says about the real questions middle schoolers have, and subjects they need to know about (addressing “I’d love to know what the Bible says about this subject, but I have no idea where to find it!”).
  3. we wanted a bible that helped young teens actually engage scripture, rather than distracting them from scripture.

and, i’m really pleased that Ignite meets all those goals. i pulled together a killer team of writers who really know young teens, including brooklyn lindsey, scott rubin, jeremy lee, crystal kirgiss, and others. and many of you helped me when we needed some quick input from real middle schoolers about the name (Ignite was the overwhelming choice of the 1500 young teens we polled).

here are some of the features:

  • Find It Fast—A table of contents and topical index on the inside cover so it’s easy to find what you need
  • Spotlight—In depth features about the big story of God and His people
  • White Hot Topics—Articles that deal with major issues that teens face today
  • Flash Points—Smaller articles that introduce teens to topics and stories they don’t know are in the Bible
  • Sparks—Highlights of Bible promises to deepen faith
  • Soul Fuel—Relevant verses pulled out for memorization

i’m particularly pleased with the Spotlight and White Hot Topics features. each them include a string of 6 entries on a particular theme, anchored to 6 different bible passages that address a particular subject. there are 10 of the Spotlight features (6 entries each on 10 critical theological subjects), and 60 of the White Hot Topics (6 each on 60 topics!). download the sampler (the book of Matthew) and you’ll get a sense of how these work. really, i could see youth workers using these topical and theological scripture threads as either preparation for teaching or as the actual fodder for small groups (even if you don’t want an NKJV bible, these elements are an extremely rich resource).

anyhow, since i had a hand in developing this beauty, The Youth Cartel gets to sell them at some really wonderful prices. i mean, we’re discounting the regular softcover (from a retail of $24.99 to $19.99) and hardcover (from a retail of $34.99 to $29.99). but since we’re really about resourcing youth workers, we’re offering some absolutely killer bulk discounts. if you pre-order 10 or more copies, we’ll discount the price 44% off retail on the softcovers (making them $13.99) and 40% off retail on the hardcovers (making them $20.99). when the bible officially releases in a few weeks, on july 16, we’ll need to raise that minimum bulk order to 20 copies (you’ll still be able to get discounts on orders of 20 or more after the release date, but the discount won’t be quite as steep).

so, download the sampler and check it out.
then, head over to the product page on The Youth Cartel store and pre-order your copies!
questions? shoot me an email ([email protected]).

my 7th grade guys invite you to the Campference, or at least that’s what they’re trying to do

ok, last week, adam came to my 7th grade guys small group (the guys with all the amazing and hilarious quotes that i post here from time to time). i scripted a little video that i was hoping we could shoot in one long camera shot, with each guy turning and looking at the camera when he had lines. the setting even allowed them to have the scripts in their laps, ensuring (in my mind) that this was possible.

but after about four takes, it became clear these were not, uh, shall we say, professional actors! (in their defense, the whole thing had a little vibe of “how can you have any pudding if you don’t eat your meat?” since we were having a pool party, and had to finish shooting this first!)

so, we regrouped, and did multiple takes of each guy’s lines, one at a time, over and over again (i often had to say the line to them many times). seriously, it was hilariously and wonderfully middle school ministry just making this thing!

the result is both a fun little promo for the middle school ministry campference, AND a glimpse at real young teens. and as a bonus: you can see me fake-reading a bible and fake-leading a small group in the background!

by the way: the early bird pricing for the campference ends in LESS THAN two weeks, on june 30 (that’s a week from saturday). the ALL-INCLUSIVE early bird rate (all-inclusive means registration, plus accommodations and all meals! seriously!) is a low, low $295 for individuals, and $270 per person for groups of 3 or more. those prices go up something like a million dollars (give or take) on july 1. so, ya know, you’ll want to act now.

the MSMC is — not exaggerating here — the coolest and most fun weekend in the year for anyone who cares about junior highers. you gotta join us. and, in case the three previous links to the website weren’t obvious enough, here’s another one.