ysmarko’s recommended music, volume seven

remedy.jpgdavid crowder band‘s new album, remedy (amazon has them listed as “david band crowder” — ha!).

i’m currently on my 12th listen-through of my absconded pre-release copy (sent to a co-worker) of this album, which doesn’t officially release until sometime in late september. and i hardly know where to start, in terms of choosing words to describe what i’m listening to.

let me start with this: for me (and i know that music is subjective), there is no god-focused collection of music better than this.

now, let me back up a bit. i was a major consumer of christian worship music for a few years. this was particularly easy to do, since we got pretty much every new ccm release through our office back then, for youthworker journal record reviews. so i didn’t even have to pay for ’em. but, at some point, it was more about being a consumer than about being consumed. it was more about what’s next and what’s new than about what’s eternal and what’s mysterious. i got bored with it all: not bored with worship; but bored with listening to worship music.

except. i never got tired of the david crowder band. maybe because they really don’t quite fit a simple genre description of worship music. it’s like, rage against the machine wrote and performed songs that were almost all political in content. but that wasn’t their genre. they were an alt-rock-rap group, or some other genre combo-platter. same here. dc*b is a nu-rock band. and they sings songs about god, pretty much exclusively so.

last evening, as i was driving in my car, with this new album at a particularly engulfing volume level, already singing along, i had two distinct images come to mind:

first, i could already imagine — it was a strong image, i felt my throat tense with emotion as i envisioned it — singing some of these songs with thousands of youth workers this fall at the national youth workers conventions. the line “you make everything glorious” from the song, “everything glorious”, was one of those lines. i can hear it now, as i type this: 4000 youth worker’s voices joining together to sing that line. crowder stepping away from the mic, making it clear we are not singing to or about him. same with the line “you never let go” from the song by that title. mmmmm.

second, i was in the midst of noticing how easy david’s voice sounds on this album. i never thought of his voice as forced before. but there’s a new level of vocal maturity here. it’s rounder, smoother, calmer, more beautiful. and then, i started to notice a similar kind of growth in the other instruments: b-wack’s tinkering and beeps and blips are more prominent, but not distracting. mike d’s keyboard (i assume it’s mike d) is downright gorgeous on the title track. jack’s guitar is extra-crunchy on “we won’t be quiet”. hogan’s violin emotively pure, like a sound of a child with a clean, pure voice, on the opening track. i could go on — the same could be said for each band member. so here’s the image i had. some things grow in a linear fashion, along a line. and that’s not necessarily bad. the next spot on the line can be better, certainly. but as i was listening, i had this image pop into my head of growth in all directions — like the growth of a firework just after bursting, or the growth of a network diagram on fast-forward. this is what the growth of dc*b feels like to me on this album.

oh, and lyrics. yeah. wow. as usual. try this one on for size, from the final cut:

and the problem is this
we were bought with a kiss
but the cheek still turned
even when it wasn’t it

and i don’t know
what to do with a love like that
and i don’t know
how to be a love like that

when all the love in the world
is right here, among us
and hatred too
so we must choose
what our hands will do

where there is pain
let there be grace
where there is suffering
bring serenity
for those afraid
help them be brave
where there is misery
bring expectancy

and surely we can change
surely we can change
something

and the problem it seems
is with you and me
not the love who came
to repair everything

and i don’t know
what to do with a love like that
and i don’t know
how to be a love like that

when all the love in the world
is right here, among us
and hatred too
and so we must choose
what our hands will do

where there is pain
let us bring grace
where there is suffering
bring serenity
for those afraid
let us be brave
where there is misery
let us bring them relief

and surely we can change
surely we can change
o sure we can change
something

the whole world’s about to change…

ok, i’m gushing, i realize. for me, this is why god invented music. sorry you have to wait a month. pre-order, i tell you.

14 thoughts on “ysmarko’s recommended music, volume seven”

  1. Mark, I agree with many of your gushing reviews but, even as big a DC*B fan as I am, I’m going to have to disagree this time. I got the album to review a few weeks ago and, well, it is good. But coming on the heels of Illuminate and A Collision, it felt like a letdown. Those albums seemed to be building toward greater experimentation and whatnot and Remedy came across as far too simple. But, perhaps that was the goal, to show that the Remedy really is that simple.

  2. OK… cruel and unusual punishment…
    You should be ashamed of yourself for taunting us with lines like this…. (an amplified quote):

    “hey guys you won’t believe how awesome the new DCB cd is… you know the awesome one that you you can’t have… or listen to… or even touch until late… september… but that I have right now and didn’t have to pay for…. yeah … that one.”

    Marko, I am sending you a pre-addressed post marked envelope just incase you need someone to lighten your load of guilt by taking the one CD off of your hands

  3. MarkO- Thanks for the review. I particularly liked your likening them to Rage (as I’m sure David would.) My enjoyment of their music over the years stems from how they really re-do something different. I love worship music in my car loud and there is just something about the DCB that draws me out. Every album seems to have a new voice and isn’t just a tired repetition of a formula that works.

    Enjoy being out of the forefront. We will soon catch up…….

  4. You’re so right about the vision of youth workers singing “Everything Glorious”. dcb debuted the song at Passion 06 and hearing almost 20,000 college students singing it was … well, there aren’t really words. Though I must admit, my personal favorite line is the one that comes after “you make everything glorious” (or at least it was the one that came next in the P06 version) … “what does that make me?”

  5. Dude, reading those lyrics gave me serious goose bumps. Been a while since a song did that to me. Yes, pre-order is a must.

  6. hey man, Crowder posted this post on his blog and I think rightfully called you a thief. So i have pre-ordered long ago. But feel free to e-mail me some tunes.

  7. I finally got to the right internet, gppgle coul;d not make it work. I’ve enjoyed your goges, music review did not mean much because it CD’s we have not tried. thanks for your Blogs!

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